Tagged: Babe Ruth

New Baseball Books

Last weekend I attended a SABR (Society of American Baseball Research) event at the Borders Bookstore across from AT+T Park in San Francisco.  It was Tim Lincecum Bobblehead Night at the stadium and at 4:15 the line to get the bobblehead was strung out almost back to downtown SF.  But my friend Sandy and I were not there to snag a replica of “The Freak,” but to hear three authors talk about their recently-published baseball books.  Let me introduce them to you.

 


Home, Away Cover.jpgJeff Gillenkirk has written a baseball novel, entitled Home, Away.  Jason Thibideaux is a  pitcher who has a bright future in professional baseball.  After a divorce which brings out the worst in both parties, he fails to secure joint custody of his two-year-old son whom he raised full time for the previous year while his wife finished law school. Jason is devastated at being separated from his son for long periods of time as he embarks on his baseball career. 

Over the next few years, through many ups and downs in his career and in his relationship with his son, Jason arrives at the crossroads and must make a gut-wrenching choice between family and career.

“Home, Away has it all — realistic family drama, the action of professional sports, witty dialogue … I was captivated from beginning to end. Gillenkirk’s book is a home run.” –Holly Goldberg Sloan, screenwriter, “Angels in the Outfield.”

I am about halfway through Home, Away, and am enjoying it thoroughly.

 


Joe Cronin Book Cover.jpgMark Armour
is the author of Joe Cronin: A Life in Baseball.  Joe Cronin was a player for 20 years for the Washington Senators and the Boston Red Sox, and was a 7-time allstar. He became a player-manager at the age of 26, a General Manager at age 40, President of the American League in 1950, and in the Mid-60’s was kicked upstairs to the Chairman of the League, a largely ceremonial position.  He had almost 45 years at the level of manager or above, and spent over a half-century in baseball.

“For so many decades, Joe Cronin has defied the ambitions of biographers…until now, as Mark Armour finally brings us a revealing portrait of this towering figure in the game’s history,” says Rob Neyer of ESPN.  “His treatment is both thorough and (equally important) very readable,” according to Bill Nowlin, author of more than 20 books on the Red Sox.

 


1921 Cover.jpgSteve L. Steinberg
, a baseball historian, is the co-author (with Lyle Spats) of the book “1921: The Yankees, The Giants and the Fight for Baseball Supremacy in New York.” 1921 was the year that the Yankees won their first pennant.  John McGraw of the Giants had always been the personification of New York baseball.  As owner, general manager, and field manager (all at the same time), he called every pitch and managed in the old style of baseball.

By and large, the Yankees were a mediocre team before 1921.  But that year, the Bronx Bombers, led by Babe Ruth, emerged as the new face of baseball.  The clash between these two baseball styles and franchises is the focus of this remarkable book.

“1921 is an incredibly comprehensive look at a pivotal baseball season–for the sport, for New York, for an America finally distancing itself from war. … Iluminating and entertaining” — Frank Deford, senior contributing writer for Sports Illustrated and author.

I hope you will check these books out. They are all available on Amazon.com.  I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

 

 

Rickey Henderson Week

Rickey RecordsI had forgotten how much I loved Rickey Henderson.  I was present when he broke Lou Brock’s previous stolen base record (938 swipes)
Rickey holding 939th stolen base.jpgand then put the new record completely out of reach by increasing it to 1046, a number that most people in baseball say will never be seen again. But he holds some other records that don’t get as much ink as breaking Lou Brock’s record: he has the most lead off homeruns in history (81) and the most stolen bases in a single season (130).  Rickey scored 2,295 runs  in his career (the most by any player), and he is in the top five in several other categories. 

He truly is the best lead-off hitter of all time and the best  player in A’s history.  It was a thrill to be present while he experienced the greatest recognitions a player can receive in the sport of baseball–induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame on July 26th and the retirement of his number 24 at the Oakland Coliseum August 1st.

Hall of Fame TripI was fortunate to travel with Sports Travel and Tours on their Induction Plus trip last week.  We attended A’s games in the new Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park and Citifield,  the new home of the NY Mets.  (More on these ballparks in a future post.)  But the crown jewel of the adventure was two days in Cooperstown, NY,  to watch Rickey Nelson Henley Henderson be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.  In case you are wondering, he was named after the singer/actor son of Ozzie Nelson.

Four years ago, my husband and I had visited Cooperstown, and found a sleepy historic town
Main Street Cooperstown.gif on the edge of beautiful Lake Otsego in upstate New York,
Otsego Lake, Cooperstown.gifwhere the sidewalks rolled up when the sun went down.  It was blissful then, having the Hall of Fame to ourselves for a few hours,
Hall of Fame Cooperstown.jpgto tour slowly around the Gallery, reading about each Hall of Famer on the bronze plaques which are displayed along the walls in the order in which each player was inducted into the Hall of Fame.  A few years earlier, the Hall had built a large addition, part of which added a rotunda at the end of the Gallery to accommodate new additions to the Hall. 

But on this 2009 trip, we arrived in Cooperstown on Friday, July 25th, to overcast skies and hordes of people clogging the streets.  No solitude was to be found in the Hall of Fame either, which is as it should be on Induction Weekend.  Parents pointed out to their children the plaques of the players the dad or mom had loved when they were young.  Others stood reverently in front of the bronze images of Babe Ruth, or Lou Gehrig or Ted Williams.
Rickey's Plaque - rotated and cropped.jpgRickey’s plaque site in the new rotunda was empty as his bronze wouldn’t be installed until after the induction ceremony the next day.

That same afternoon we went to the Clark Sports Center for the “Connecting Generations” event.  It was a lot more fun than I anticipated.  Three Hall of Famers
Williams, Sandberg and Gossage - cropped.jpg–former A’s manager, Dick Williams, Ryne Sandberg, and Goose Gossage–competed against four families from the audience in a Family-Feud-style baseball trivia contest.  The Hall of Famers won by a small margin and the audience learned some things about the greats of the game.  Harold Reynolds charmingly emceed the event.  I did pretty well answering the questions along with the contestants.

I’ll stop here for today.  This is part of a long article which I will give you installments over the next few days.  There is just too much to share with you in one post.

Tomorrow:  Induction Day.  Future posts:  Induction Ceremony, Rickey Steals the Show, Rickey’s Number Retired in Oakland.